Thursday, February 28, 2008

Classifying Experiences

Stephen Anderson is an "experience architect" at Sabre Travel Network, and has created a poster to communicate how people Sort, Classify, and Label Experiences. Read Stephen's blog post explaining his efforts.

Found on NiXLOG.

Tuesday, February 26, 2008

Infographics for Advocacy

I got a note from John Emerson, the author of Visualizing Information for Advocacy, and I wanted to share that his booklet on using infographics for NGO's and advocacy organizations is now available online as a free PDF (6.9MB) at Although geared to advocacy groups, the information is definitely relevant to everyone.

John also has a blog post up on Social Design Notes.

Outstanding job John!

Sunday, February 24, 2008

Conquest of Mount Everest

Cool infographic poster from showing the many expeditions leading up to the 1953 successful team to make it to the top of My. Everest.
Every major expedition before the successful climb of Mount Everest is detailed on the left side of the print. The circles provide an easy to view key into the history of each expedition including expedition length, type and height achieved. The flow of climbers from one expedition to another is tracked with graceful lines.

The right side of the print is devoted to the successful 1953 assault. The entire expedition is mapped showing the exact climbing history by altitude of each of the main phases of the assault. In addition, the weather for each day is provided.

Friday, February 22, 2008

National Gruntledness Index

New interactive map on charts the results of user survey data on how gruntled (or disgruntled) people are with their jobs across the country. You can even narrow the map results to a particular industry.

The map doesn't change that often, but when you roll your mouse over the map, it highlights the cities where the score has changed.

Thanks Kevin for the email.

Wednesday, February 20, 2008

Family Movement Map

Cool infographic project on Flickr, this map of the living room tracks the movements of a family over the course of only one hour on Christmas Day in 2006. Posted on Flickr by The Bumblebee.

Thanks Oliver for sending me the link.

Tuesday, February 19, 2008

Meet The World, Infographic Flags

Meet The World is an infographic project that uses the colors of eight national flags to represent some of the current issues in the world.
Icaro Doria is Brazilian, 25 and has been working for the magazine Grande Reportagem, in Lisbon, Portugal, for the last 3 years. He is part of the team (with Luis Silva Dias, João Roque, Andrea Vallenti and João Roque) that produced the flags campaign which has been circulating the Earth in chain letters via e-mail.
I found the link to this on

Monday, February 18, 2008

GE Ecomagination Blueprint Ads

GE is running The Blueprint Series of five print ads combining photos with an overlay of infographics. This works really nicely because they kept the infographics relatively simple.

Found on

Sunday, February 17, 2008

Motion Graphics: Ocean's Thirteen

Made by Mattias Berlamont as a class project, this quick video integrates text and simple animation to a scene from the movie Ocean's Thirteen.

Great job Mattias!

Saturday, February 16, 2008

LEGO Brick 50th Anniversary Timeline

Neat timeline of the 50-year history of LEGO bricks. The photos of the bricks as they were in each time period really makes this a great timeline. Plus, LEGOs are just fun.

Found on

Friday, February 15, 2008

5,000 years of Faith

From, this is a 90-second flash video showing when the major religions formed and where they spread across the globe. Great combination of a map with a timeline.

Found on

Wednesday, February 13, 2008

Crucial Memory Ad

Crucial Memory, has this ad running in Mac magazines right now. It's amusing, but not actually informative. The infographics aren't the real directions to install memory. Instead, its an infographic style that tells the consumer they will be happier if they install more memory. I like it because the infographic style adds credibility.

Monday, February 11, 2008

The Timeline of "Cool"

Found on Wikipedia, this is the timeline of what was "Cool" from 1500 A.D. through today. Apparently, the Beatles aren't cool anymore...

Saturday, February 9, 2008

Concentric Circle Disaster

Breaking News: Series Of Concentric Circles Emanating From Glowing Red Dot

This had one had me laughing out loud. From, a news parody of how disasters are covered on TV using infographics. Watch out for those circles!

Found on Infosthetics.

Friday, February 8, 2008

How many employees does Google have?

16,805 full-time employees worldwide as of December 31, 2007, Google says. Here on visualized with one icon per person. It's a big image.

Found on Infosthetics.

Thursday, February 7, 2008

Social Media Building

Another infographic advertisement from to share around your office. How do the different Web2.0 services available today address the different needs within a company? An ideal graphic to share with the people in your organization that don't really understand how they can use these new web services.

Elliance is posting a weekly series of infographics on their site to help explain their services.

Tuesday, February 5, 2008

Search Engine Optimization is posting a weekly series of infographics to help explain and advertise their SEO services. These graphics talk directly to corporate individuals that want better websites, but don't design websites themselves.

A great way to use infographics to talk to your target customers, and I think it shows how well Elliance knows their target audience.

Thanks Christy!

Monday, February 4, 2008

Who has the Nuclear Weapons?

An infographic video from GOOD Magazine, a quick 3-minute video that shows who has the nukes, how many they have, and how much damage would one nuke hitting the Empire State Building cause.

Found on

Saturday, February 2, 2008

The Life Cycle of a Blog Post

Wired magazine has this infographic flow chart of what happens after someone posts on their blog. From aggregators to text scrapers, your posts live a life of their own on the Internet.
You click Publish and lean back to admire your work. Imperceptibly and all but instantaneously, your post slips into a vast and recursive network of software agents, where it is crawled, indexed, mined, scraped, republished, and propagated throughout the Web.
It's on their multimedia section of the website, but the only multimedia aspect it has is zoom, which is a little disappointing.

Thanks Oliver for sending me the link!